Chiropractic Meridian ID Brain Injury

Over the years I’ve seen countless individuals who have recovered far beyond what was considered possible by medical experts.

I know that with the right plan you can as well.

While there is no one-size-fits-all approach to recovery from traumatic brain injury, creating an effective care plan can make all the difference in managing symptoms and improving quality of life.

There will be plenty who will try to sell you on a magic bullet solution as the one thing, but this doesn’t exist and you’ll gain a better understanding as to why.

This article will discuss what a traumatic brain injury care plan in Meridian ID entails and how it can help those recovering from this type of traumatic incident. We’ll also cover tips for developing an individualized plan tailored to each individual’s needs and goals. With proper planning, survivors of TBI can take back control of their lives and begin the challenging yet rewarding journey towards healing.

We are going to review:

  • What is a traumatic brain injury
  • Steps for developing an individualized care plan
  • Tips for managing symptoms and improving quality of life

WHAT IS TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY (TBI) IN MERIDIAN ID?

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a type of physical trauma to the brain caused by an external force, such as a car accident, sports-related incident, domestic abuse, or fall. This can range in severity from mild concussion to more serious and even fatal cases. In the United States alone, more than 2 million people suffer from TBI annually; which is likely under-reported as many mild TBI’s never receive a diagnosis or evaluation. It is the #1 cause of death and disability under the age of 44.

TBI occurs when a person experiences a blow or jolt to their head that results in disruption of normal brain function. It can be caused by direct contact with the head, such as being struck by an object or falling onto a hard surface. It can also be caused by forces other than direct contact, such as rapid acceleration and deceleration of the head or sudden jerking movements of the body due to whiplash.

Important to know, many whiplash injuries are also brain injuries but haven’t received the proper diagnosis yet. If some of the symptoms below sound familiar then it is likely you fall into that category.

Common symptoms associated with TBI include headaches, dizziness, confusion, blurry vision, fatigue, difficulty concentrating and remembering things, difficulty in processing thoughts (known as “brain fog”), changes in mood or personality, poor coordination and balance issues.

These symptoms may persist for weeks, months and even years after the traumatic event has occurred. In some cases, long-term cognitive impairment can result from a traumatic brain injury.

Seeking and receiving proper care is essential. Whether you have received in or out patient rehab, I want you to know that even if they have brought you as far as they can, that doesn’t mean you have peaked. It just means you need a higher level approach.


STEPS FOR DEVELOPING AN INDIVIDUALIZED CARE PLAN

When a person has sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI), the recovery process requires a comprehensive, individualized care plan. The goal of the care plan is to support and guide the patient through the course of their healing journey, assisting them to reclaim as much of their pre-injury physical, psychological, and cognitive functioning as possible. A well-crafted care plan should be tailored to an individual’s specific needs and circumstances, taking into account multiple aspects of their medical history, lifestyle factors, and progress over time.

The first step in developing an individualized care plan for a person with a traumatic brain injury is to have a provider who can guide the journey. You may need to work with a variety of providers, but having too many opinions can create confusion. The provider that is guiding the journey should have an excellent understanding of traumatic brain injuries and understand what would impact recovery.

I understand that you may have a primary care provider that you have a very strong relationship with, but they are not specialists in brain injuries and shouldn’t be the guide.

With the right guide they are going to lay out what needs to happen and the first part is helping you gain an understanding of what you are dealing with.

When looking at a TBI you need to have an understanding of how your brain is connecting as well as what would prevent it from connecting appropriately. (Read this again, it may seem simple but is very complex)

To gain an understanding of how your brain is connecting certain tests are critical:

  • Oculomotor testing (eye movements)
  • Vestibular testing (balance)
  • QEEG (brain waves to look at functions of the brain)
  • MRI (little to no value in concussion but can have tremendous value in more severe TBI)
  • Brain based evaluation (physical evaluation that looks at a variety of factors such as movement, sensation, coordination, and cognition)

Everything but the MRI can be performed in an office and to get through the brain based evaluation it should take about 90 minutes with some taking longer. This doesn’t include the time to talk with you and to do the next part.

What would sabotage the ability of the brain to connect appropriately?

When looking at a TBI it is important to know that there are issues with energy, inflammation, and blood flow/oxygenation.

Not everything in these areas can be measured which is frustrating, but there are plenty of things that can and should be.

These symptoms may persist for weeks, months and even years after the traumatic event has occurred. In some cases, long-term cognitive impairment can result from a traumatic brain injury.

Seeking and receiving proper care is essential. Whether you have received in or out patient rehab, I want you to know that even if they have brought you as far as they can, that doesn’t mean you have peaked. It just means you need a higher level approach.


STEPS FOR DEVELOPING AN INDIVIDUALIZED CARE PLAN

When a person has sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI), the recovery process requires a comprehensive, individualized care plan. The goal of the care plan is to support and guide the patient through the course of their healing journey, assisting them to reclaim as much of their pre-injury physical, psychological, and cognitive functioning as possible. A well-crafted care plan should be tailored to an individual’s specific needs and circumstances, taking into account multiple aspects of their medical history, lifestyle factors, and progress over time.

The first step in developing an individualized care plan for a person with a traumatic brain injury is to have a provider who can guide the journey. You may need to work with a variety of providers, but having too many opinions can create confusion. The provider that is guiding the journey should have an excellent understanding of traumatic brain injuries and understand what would impact recovery.

I understand that you may have a primary care provider that you have a very strong relationship with, but they are not specialists in brain injuries and shouldn’t be the guide.

With the right guide they are going to lay out what needs to happen and the first part is helping you gain an understanding of what you are dealing with.

When looking at a TBI you need to have an understanding of how your brain is connecting as well as what would prevent it from connecting appropriately. (Read this again, it may seem simple but is very complex)

To gain an understanding of how your brain is connecting certain tests are critical:

  • Oculomotor testing (eye movements)
  • Vestibular testing (balance)
  • QEEG (brain waves to look at functions of the brain)
  • MRI (little to no value in concussion but can have tremendous value in more severe TBI)
  • Brain based evaluation (physical evaluation that looks at a variety of factors such as movement, sensation, coordination, and cognition)

Everything but the MRI can be performed in an office and to get through the brain based evaluation it should take about 90 minutes with some taking longer. This doesn’t include the time to talk with you and to do the next part.

What would sabotage the ability of the brain to connect appropriately?

When looking at a TBI it is important to know that there are issues with energy, inflammation, and blood flow/oxygenation.

Not everything in these areas can be measured which is frustrating, but there are plenty of things that can and should be.

There are many more beyond this that could be of value, but it is important to realize the brain doesn’t exist in isolation and an individualized plan identifies as many factors as possible.

With knowing how your brain is connecting as well as factors that will impact your recovery, you can now have a customized plan specific to your needs.

As you have probably noticed, there are plenty of labs and test findings that may be off and depending on your individual findings you need a different approach compared to someone else.


TIPS FOR MANAGING SYMPTOMS AND IMPROVING QUALITY OF LIFE

Recovering from a traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be an incredibly difficult process, both physically and mentally. The effects of this type of injury can be wide-ranging, and the intensity and duration of symptoms vary from person to person. However, there are steps that individuals can take to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

First, it is important for TBI survivors to have realistic expectations about recovery. It takes time for the brain to heal and regain its former level of functioning, so it is important to be patient with one’s self throughout the process. Each individual has their own journey but as long as you are continuing to see improvement keep going. This is why having the right guide is essential because they will know how to keep you progressing and working through the layers of your recovery.

Second, traditional care will only bring you so far. The therapies they use are 30-40 years old and the latest tools are considered investigational. This means it’ll be another 20-40 years until they are widely used and insurance covers them. Don’t let the term investigational fool you, because these therapies are changing lives every day.

In addition to what you do in the office, lifestyle modifications are also necessary in order to facilitate recovery from a TBI. Eating a healthy diet full of fresh vegetables and some fruits as well as lean proteins and healthy fats helps provide energy needed for healing and reduces inflammation that may slow recovery. Exercise also helps rebuild strength and reduce fatigue; for those who cannot exercise vigorously due to pain or other limitations, gentle forms such as yoga or tai chi may still bring benefits without overstressing the body or brain.

Remember, anything is better than nothing. It is okay if you can’t workout as long or as hard as you want to.

Managing stress levels is another important part of recovering from a traumatic brain injury. There is an abundance of research that shows how stress increases inflammation in the body which can worsen symptoms associated with TBIs such as headaches, memory issues, trouble concentrating or sleeping problems. Finding activities that bring joy such as hobbies like drawing, playing music, or hiking can help relieve stress levels significantly.

One of the things I have individuals do is write down the 3 things they enjoy the most and to rate how often they do it. If the answer is not very often, then start setting goals to incorporate those activities more.

Your social group is critically important. Who are the 5 individuals that get your most time and energy? These need to be positive individuals, if they are not then recovery becomes harder. TBI’s are still poorly understood in the general population which leads to a lack of understanding from family, friends, and co-workers which creates more stress.

Finally, it is important for those recovering from traumatic brain injuries to appreciate themselves throughout their journey towards healing.

Pro tip, take pictures and videos throughout your journey as it will be easier to see progress compared to if you only try to use memory alone.

Remind yourself that you are strong despite your hardships, celebrate small successes along the way – even if they seem inconsequential – and give yourself patience when things don’t go according to plan. Taking care of yourself emotionally will make a big difference in your health overall and help promote faster recovery times after a traumatic brain injury.

By following these tips concerning symptom management and improved quality of life while recovering from a traumatic brain injury, individuals dealing with these types of injuries will better able cope with the difficulties associated with them and begin regaining strength more quickly than would otherwise be possible without taking these steps into account.


PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be a difficult and often life-altering experience. It’s important to create an individualized care plan with the help of medical professionals who understand TBI and its impact on quality of life. With their guidance, you can develop strategies for managing symptoms and improving your quality of life. There is no one-size-fits all approach when it comes to recovering from a traumatic brain injury, as everyone responds differently to treatment methods.

Whether you have recently experienced or are years out from a traumatic brain injury and are looking for support on your journey to recovery, contact us today to learn more about how we can help.

With our proprietary BMB Method we are able to create a customized plan for you to accelerate your recovery in as little as 1-2 weeks with our brain boot camp.

Take the first step towards recovering from a traumatic brain injury now by requesting a consultation.